You are currently viewing As a former pilot, I’m not sure if the theatre of the truth or the 100% lies makes me feel safer.
Boeing's solution was a software program called MCAS which automatically pushed the nose of the aircraft down to avoid stalling

As a former pilot, I’m not sure if the theatre of the truth or the 100% lies makes me feel safer.

(Editor) Yes, I did have a pilots licence, and all things aeronautical always interested me up to NASA, so …. I had been looking at this story for a long time. Like most things in life, if the 1 + 1 does not easily equal 2, then generally you have a problem Houston.

Boeing’s solution was a software program called MCAS which automatically pushed the nose of the aircraft down to avoid stalling (The only issue here, is this was done by software and not shown, explained, or tested in flight simulation by Boeing)

The 737 MAX disaster is without a doubt the greatest corporate catastrophe and cover-up in aviation history. Why? Because of money. Boeing had promised airline companies the MAX would handle just as previous 737 models had and would not require expensive flight simulator re-training for pilots.

“It’s just wrong. They avoided the true safety issues here for cost, because it was going to cost about $10 billion to do a proper certification,” said Trevor Jensen, the former technical director of the Australian International Pilots Association.

In Boeing’s view, pilots didn’t need to know about this software program that could literally take control of the plane.

“To let a system operate flight controls that overpowers the pilot. That’s just unbelievable,” said aviation expert Byron Bailey.

When two Boeing 737 MAX planes crashed and killed 346 people, the world’s biggest aircraft manufacturer was brought to its knees.

BOEING’S FATAL FLAW

In 2010, Boeing tried to upgrade its oldest aircraft, the 737. What they came up with was the 737 MAX, with new fuel-efficient engines. 

The engines were too large for the 737’s 1960s design and had to be moved forward on the wings, creating a lift effect and making the MAX vulnerable to stalling.

Boeing’s solution was a software program called MCAS, which automatically pushed the nose of the aircraft down to avoid stalling.

Incredibly though, the pilots were not told about the existence of MCAS, nor that it relied on only one “angle of attack” sensor to be activated. 

Dash Editor

Self-confessed confused news junkie, with lifelong additions to coffee, great conversations, perfection in all its forms, cold wine, hot music and puppy dogs.

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